Ryan Aghdam

Weber Smokey Mountain Seasoning

It’s commonly thought that seasoning a smoker is necessary before cooking. In the case of the Weber Smokey Mountain (and many other consumer-grade smokers) seasoning is not required because it is made of steel with a porcelain enamel finish. It is only raw steel smokers that require seasoning.

Because it was my first time using a smoker, I did a trial run without any meat to learn how to regulate and maintain temperature.

Here’s the process I followed:

First, ignite 40 briquettes in a chimney.

Briquettes lit in an chimney. This particular chimney was on sale at Target for $4. Invest in a Weber chimney instead.
Briquettes lit in an chimney. This particular chimney was on sale at Target for $4. Invest in a Weber chimney instead.

Next, place 40 briquettes in the base of the smoker in a circle, leaving the middle open. The technique is called the Minon method. The briquettes on the outer part of the smoker are lit slowly, maintaining the temperature for several hours.

Briquettes arranged in a circle, ready to be lit.
Briquettes arranged in a circle, ready to be lit.

After the briquettes in the chimney are ignited, place them inside the 40 briquettes in the base of the smoker.

Monitor the temperature, experimenting with the vents to help get a feel for regulating your smoker’s temperature. Keep an eye on the temperature and keep notes.

Logging temperatues for future reference.
Logging temperatues for future reference.

After a bit of experimenting with temperature regulation, I had a feel for what was necessary to maintain and change temperature.